Starry Night Julep Cup

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LOCALLY SOURCED CERAMIC ART

Nothing feels cozier on a cold winter night than sipping from a warm piece of ceramic art. Our Starry Night Julep Cup is equally at home filled with mulled toddies for Grandma, as with tea or hot cocoa for little ones. 

CARBONDALE CLAY CENTER

Carbondale Clay Center provided kits, instruction, glazing, and firing. When we asked the CCC about collaborating for this holiday offering, the immediate response was Yes. The coronavirus has certainly changed the downtown hub for ceramic artists, where adult workshops, kid classes, art openings, and outrageously fun events once peppered the calendar. It seems nothing can daunt Angela  Bruno, the executive director and her crew – gallery and studio manager Matthew Eames, and marketing manager Savanna LaBauve.  Facing a change in how the world engages with hands-on activities, the CCC team pivoted quickly to restructure their programming. 

“Art keeps us connected, especially when we can’t all be together,” Bruno shares. “Our modified programming is designed to keep children involved in the arts, in the safety of their homes. We hope to inspire creating and hands-on making.” 

CCC’S NEW OFFERINGS

CCC says their new Take-Home Clay Kits are for kids, but truly, we can all benefit from the therapeutic experience of shaping and warming a dense, smooth chunk of earth, forming it into an object of our own making. Shape it, pound it, roll it, mold it into a ball, then start over. Each kit includes 5 pounds of reclaimed clay and tools: a sponge, wooden rib, metal rib, wooden knife, fettling knife, small double-sided loop tool, and wire tool. Plus access to an instructional video and a tote bag.

Keep your eye on the CCC’s website to sign up for Family Clay Play. Spots go quickly for these small-scale studio classes where parents or grandparents and children work alongside one another to create with clay and decorate with underglazes.  Instruction, all materials and firing fees are included. Hint – if you have a hankering for making handmade gifts this year, clay is a perfect way to make your own unique, functional, collectible art.  

ROARING FORK VALLEY KIDS WHO CARE

Meet the Roaring Fork Valley  Kids Who Care, the artists behind our Starry Night Julep Cups.

This child-driven organization was created by mothers Kirsten Morey and Kris Freeman who wanted to support their children’s passion to make a difference. They modeled their program after Sopris 100 Who Care, a women’s group that pools funds to benefit a variety of local programs. These young philanthropists make and sell products, then collectively choose how to use their proceeds to support causes dear to their hearts, such as endangered sea turtles. They used funds they raised last school year to adopt ten loggerhead turtle nests, protecting 75-100 hatchlings per nest.

The group set up a First Friday tent displaying customized keychains, air plants, and lip balm. It was just taking off and they were getting geared up for a big summer when the pandemic hit. When we heard the kids were wishing for a venue, we reached about about a commissioned collection.

The artists worked with our Starry Sky motif to depict constellations of all sizes and shapes, and the overall body of work reflects a variety of interpretations. In limited edition, of course. Hand painted and signed.

Through this project, RFV Kids Who Care will be able to adopt four more loggerhead turtle nests.  


PURCHASE THE LOCALLY SOURCED HOLIDAY GIFT BOX

MP Julep Cup

LEARN MORE about Carbondale Clay Center
LEARN MORE about Roaring Fork Valley Kids Who Care


MEET OTHER LOCALLY SOURCED ARTISTS

Lilybart – Starry Night Journal
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Jill Scher – Sculptural Felted Soap
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Jan Schubert – Starry Night Beeswax Pillar Candle
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Vera Herbals – Moisturizing Hemp Lipbalm
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Homsted – Relax Essential Oil



TEACHERS

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and our Locally Sourced Featured Artists

About Kathryn Camp

MOUNTAIN PARENT Editor & Designer • When Kathryn is not at her desk with MP, she cycles, snowboards, skis, writes fiction and keeps bees in downtown Carbondale with her teenage children, husband Rich, and their wayward husky-coyote Zelda.